Hurricane Electric's IPv6 Tunnel Broker Forums

General IPv6 Topics => IPv6 Basics & Questions & General Chatter => Topic started by: broquea on July 09, 2008, 12:51:26 PM

Title: Book List
Post by: broquea on July 09, 2008, 12:51:26 PM
I wanted to provide a list of books, that we use and recommend for both staff and customers for reference and becoming more familiar with IPv6 in general. If you have any reviews of these books specifically or want to recommend other titles, please feel free to share!

O'Reilly's IPv6 Essentials By Silvia Hagen & IPv6 Network Administration By David Malone, Niall Murphy
Both of these books cover the very basics of IPv6, as well as branching out into much more detailed information regarding the protocol. I consider IPv6 Essentials mandatory reading, especially for a technical support role.

Apress' Running IPv6 by Iljitsch van Beijnum
Excellent guide for getting IPv6 up and running on a variety of platforms.

Microsoft's Understanding IPv6 by Joseph Davies
This book covers both a detailed introduction to IPv6, as well as getting it up and running as a client or server. It has information spanning XP/2003/Vista/2008 platforms, and the pros and cons of each.

Morgan Kaufman's Theory, Protocol, and Practice by Pete Loshin
A good resource that covers what is wrong with IPv4, how IPv6 can help, but also some of the problems facing IPv6.  It has a bunch of configuration examples for operating systems as well as Cisco appliances. There is a really decent section on real-world IPv6 security practices, as well as configuring Internet services that are a must like DNS, Email, etc.

Planning for IPv6 by Silvia Hagen
Another well written and composed book by Silvia that addresses testing, implementation and deployment of IPv6 into your lab and production networks.
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: pcreager on April 10, 2011, 01:30:30 PM
"Running IPv6" author is Iljitsch van Beijnum.   ;)
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: snarked on April 11, 2011, 01:11:56 PM
Microsoft doesn't understand IPv6.  They don't even understand email!  Microsoft violates the Internet standards all the time.
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: pcreager on April 11, 2011, 11:18:01 PM
snarked, I agree that Microsoft always puts their own spin on standards, but that particular book is packed with a lot of good, OS-agnostic technical detail.
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: colonelf74 on July 02, 2012, 11:12:04 AM
You may want to mention the classic "TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The Protocols".

For myself, the answer's always in there.
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: nazirCZ on July 08, 2012, 12:49:14 PM
There is also a book "IPv6" by Pavel Satrapa (available in both printed and electronic (pdf, epub, mobi) form).
Unfortunately, it is probably only in Czech language...
http://knihy.nic.cz (http://knihy.nic.cz)
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: azcrumpty on September 01, 2012, 10:07:31 AM

the following book is also good.  Another by the same author is for advanced usage.


IPv6 Core Protocols Implementation
by  Qing Li, Tatuya Jinmei and Keiichi Shima
Elsevier Science and Technology Books, Inc. 2007 (969 pages)
ISBN:9780124477513
Revealing all of the details of the KAME IPv6 protocol stack, this book dissects both the code and its design to illustrate how IPv6 and its related protocols have been interpreted and implemented from the specifications.
Recommend? 
Title: Re: Book List
Post by: pdordal on November 09, 2017, 08:29:34 AM
I'd like to suggest my own open textbook An Introduction to Computer Networks, http://intronetworks.cs.luc.edu/ (http://intronetworks.cs.luc.edu/), and, in particular, the IPv6 chapter http://intronetworks.cs.luc.edu/current/html/ipv6.html (http://intronetworks.cs.luc.edu/current/html/ipv6.html).

It's not as technical as some of the other resources listed here, but I like to think it provides a reasonably good general overview. It has the added advantage of being free, and therefore available for immediate access.

Comments and criticisms are always welcome. The book is updated regularly, so corrections are easy to incorporate.

Peter Dordal
Loyola University Chicago CS Dept