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Messages - kcochran

Pages: 1 ... 25 26 [27]
391
General Discussion / Re: Problems with "Update info"
« on: April 29, 2009, 05:36:23 PM »
I'm not able to reproduce this.

If you're still seeing this, can you email your browser/OS/URL you're using/etc. details to ipv6@he.net?

392
Questions & Answers / Re: Dynamic ip, blocked HE page
« on: April 29, 2009, 05:12:19 PM »
the "bug" in html

Code: [Select]
<base href="http://tunnelbroker.net/" />

Fixed.

393
Questions & Answers / Re: Feature request for ipv4_end.php
« on: March 10, 2009, 05:07:56 PM »
If ipv4b = AUTO, it'll use the requesting client's IP address for the updated endpoint.

One thing to be careful of:
If you're going through an HTTP proxy, you'll be updating with the proxy's IP address.

394
General Discussion / Re: Problems with "Update info"
« on: March 06, 2009, 12:47:38 PM »
Ok, this time for sure.  Fixed.

395
General Discussion / Re: Problems with "Update info"
« on: March 06, 2009, 11:35:17 AM »
This should be corrected now.

396
Questions & Answers / Re: BGP creating doesn't work
« on: March 02, 2009, 11:43:48 AM »
Should be working now.

397
General Discussion / Re: password reset not working
« on: February 15, 2009, 07:53:48 PM »
I just tested it from here, and received the mail as expected, and the password works.

One thing to note, however: the password reset only resets your tunnelbroker password.  There is a good reason for this: if we change the forum password, you can't login to ask questions like this if you've got a saved session or the browser has it saved.  In order to update the forum password, you'd have to go into the tb "Update Info" page and change it there to sync 'em both up.

398
Questions & Answers / Re: Adjusting tunnel MTU
« on: February 15, 2009, 06:46:28 AM »
1500 isn't a transit network limitation, we use jumbo frames wherever possible.  Most of the links in LA, for example are 9212.

399
Questions & Answers / Re: Looking glass traceroute
« on: January 13, 2009, 10:59:51 AM »
The onChange() auto-postback on the protocol change is gone, and the page is functionally JS-free now.

400
Questions & Answers / Re: Looking glass traceroute
« on: January 12, 2009, 01:17:18 PM »
Do you have JavaScript disabled?

The only time I've seen that is when Javascript is disabled, so the onChange() for the select element for Query Type doesn't get fired.  I just tried it here with JS on, and my own server's v6 address, which is syntactically similar to the one you posted, and it completed without that error.

The onChange() can probably go away now in any case.  It used to be needed to repopulate the router selection when there was a different list for v4 and v6.  With all the available routers now dual-stack, that's no longer the case.  I'll see what I can do to remove that call and de-JS-ify the page.

401
Questions & Answers / Re: Google over IPv6
« on: January 12, 2009, 10:45:46 AM »
And any ideas what user can do about this without using ISP's resolver. ATM, I access most of Google's services (Gmail, Search, Reader) over IPv6 by putting up their IPv6 endpoint mapped with the domain names of these services in my /etc/hosts which works fine, but I'm wondering if there is anything could be done over DNS level, so that other box in LAN can also enjoy similar experience without modifying their /etc/hosts. BtW, instead of using ISP's resolver, I run my own DNS resolver.

Thanks

If all your local hosts are using your local resolver, you could do effectively the same thing with it as you're doing with hosts, and that's to setup a zone for google.com in your local resolver.  This does have a couple gotchas in that if Google changes any addresses, you won't be able to reach the new ones, as your resolver will never check for them (same issue you have with /etc/hosts), and if there's a subdomain of Google's that you don't have in your zone, you'll get a no such host reply back if you try and hit it, unless your resolver will let you do limited overrides of an external zone.

402
Ahh... you should be able to setup additional static v6 addresses on the system, but how to have that app use that specific address... that's application dependent.  If they don't give you the option to setup what address it should bind to, you'll just get the best facing one to the destination, or the first one configured usually.

403
If you've got radvd running on the router, everything on your internal LAN should be getting addresses from that /64.  The address they'll get will be the same every time as it should be a combination of the /64 prefix and your Ethernet card's hardware address (48bits) with a fffe shoved in the middle and one additional bit flipped.  Gotta love autoconfig... simple in principle, but it sounds more complicated in the telling.

Overall each system should have one automatic 'public' IPv6 address based off the routed /64 as detailed above, and that's the one you should be able to use for incoming Apache requests, and what you'd present yourself to IPv6 enabled IRC servers as.  You'll also have one or more local ones (fe80::/16 prefixes for example), but those are all local to your network, and invisible to the rest of the world.

404
Ok, their example is a little dated, but really only in the use of /127s instead of /64s for the tunnel v6 endpoints.

Based on their example, and your settings, you'd need something akin to this, replacing the addresses with your v4 address, and the tunnelbroker's IP that you're connected to, as noted in the tunnel details page.

Code: [Select]
/usr/sbin/ip tunnel add sixbone mode sit local YOURV4IP remote SERVERV4IP
/usr/sbin/ip link set sixbone up
/usr/sbin/ip link set mtu 1280 dev sixbone
/usr/sbin/ip tunnel change sixbone ttl 64
/usr/sbin/ip -6 addr add 2001:470:1f06:6c5::2/64 dev sixbone
/usr/sbin/ip -6 ro add default via 2001:470:1f06:6c5::1 dev sixbone
/usr/sbin/ip -6 addr add 2001:470:1f07:6c5::/64 dev br0

The prefix for radvd.conf would also be using 2001:470:1f07:6c5::/64

405
Well, the 2001:470:1f06:6c5::2/64 has to exist as that's what the routed /64 is routed through.  It's not there for just ICMP, it's your designated public facing router IPv6 address.

So your network would look something like this

2001:470:1f07:6c5::X/64 <-- V
2001:470:1f07:6c5::Y/64 <-- LAN --> 2001:470:1f07:6c5::?/64 <-- Router --> 2001:470:1f06:6c5::2/64 <--TUNNEL--> 2001:470:1f06:6c5::1/64 <-- HE Tunnelbroker
2001:470:1f07:6c5::Z/64 <-- ^

You can create rDNS entries for anything in the routed /64 or /48, and yes, they should be specific addresses, though you could get creative with wildcards if you really wanted to go down the path of assigning the entire subnet.

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