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Author Topic: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully  (Read 6778 times)

pastorbadger

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moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« on: October 21, 2013, 07:45:16 PM »

moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully.  Help!   

I have spent days poring through these posts, and I haven’t found anyone trying to do exactly what I’m doing (which probably means I should be doing it) but I wanted to go on record as saying I always dig deep before I post.

The computers:
I have several Windows 7 workstations on the local LAN, along with various other devices.  (NAS, cameras, PS3, switches, WAP, etc.)

The router:
A CISCO RVS4000 router.  The router does not understand any IPv6 to/in IPv4 work, but it does understand IPv6 on the LAN side. (You can specify the IPv6 gateway address, and it will do IPv6 DHCP for you.)

The goal:
I tried to move the tunnel to a different machine on the LAN. Now I have goofed everything up and I don’t have the skills to, well, un-goof-it-up.

The history:
I got the HE tunnel working on machine “A”.  I followed directions meticulously and even specified the local (192.168) address in the “add v6v4tunnel” command, and not the WAN address.  Seemed easy as pie, even though I had no idea what I was parroting with the commands.  It worked on machine “A”.  I was even able to run an FTP server on the machine and accept connections from an FTP client, both on the same LAN (after opening the machine’s firewall) and from the Internet (after opening the router’s firewall).

Then, I tried to “move” the tunnel to machine “B”.  First, I tried just repeating the commands on machine “B”. 

When that wouldn't work, I suspected duplicate addresses on the same LAN from machine "A", so I tried to delete everything.

Then I shut machine "A" off and reset the switch and router.

When that didn’t work, I tried deleting the tunnel at HE and creating a new “/64”.

Over the course of then next week, I made several guesses based on stuff I read here with no success.

Then I just hammered at it like the monkey with the typewriter that I am.

I’m hopelessly lost now.  I’m tantalizingly close, though.  The “ping –6” commands give me this:

First the assigned address looked good:

C:\Windows\system32>ping -6 2001:470:7b:1e6::2

Pinging 2001:470:7b:1e6::2 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::2: time<1ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::2: time<1ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::2: time<1ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::2: time<1ms

Ping statistics for 2001:470:7b:1e6::2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms


Then, the putative gateway address looked not as good: (How can it say “destination host unreachable”, and then give you ping results from that host)

C:\Windows\system32>ping -6 2001:470:7b:1e6::1

Pinging 2001:470:7b:1e6::1 with 32 bytes of data:
Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::1: time=48ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::1: time=76ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::1: time=95ms

Ping statistics for 2001:470:7b:1e6::1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 3, Lost = 1 (25% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 48ms, Maximum = 95ms, Average = 73ms


And finally, google exposed me for the failure that I am:

C:\Windows\system32>ping -6 ipv6.google.com

Pinging ipv6.l.google.com [2607:f8b0:4000:806::1013] with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 2607:f8b0:4000:806::1013:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),


No joy there.  Here is the configuration, such as it is:


C:\Windows\system32>ipconfig/all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Kitten-PC
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection 2:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom 802.11g Network Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : C4-17-FE-7E-7C-7F
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Atheros AR8132 PCI-E Fast Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.20)
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 70-5A-B6-27-6C-DC
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::3(Preferred)
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:c377:bad:fd01:1c23:2b:31d0(Preferred)
   Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2001:470:c377:bad:e08a:21b2:9cfc:8de4(Preferred)
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::fd01:1c23:2b:31d0%10(Preferred)
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.52(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Monday, October 21, 2013 3:23:20 PM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, October 22, 2013 3:23:20 PM
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:c377:bad::1
                                       fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%10
                                       192.168.1.16
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.16
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:4860:4860::8888
                                       2001:4860:4860::8844
                                       192.168.1.16
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter IP6Tunnel:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Direct Point-to-point Adapater
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::2(Preferred)
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::699a:7ad9:b412:8730%25(Preferred)
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::1
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:4860:4860::8888
                                       2001:4860:4860::8844
                                       192.168.1.16
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{2BE7B38B-9ACF-414D-B060-E9CD1C76DF17}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{02E27394-63FF-47BE-B1F9-E2923DA474C5}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #2
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes


And I don’t know what this is but I saw other people include it so I figured more information couldn’t hurt:


C:\Windows\system32>netsh interface ipv6 show route

Publish  Type      Met  Prefix                    Idx  Gateway/Interface Name
-------  --------  ---  ------------------------  ---  ------------------------
No       Manual    256  ::/0                       25  2001:470:7b:1e6::1
No       Manual    256  ::/0                       10  2001:470:c377:bad::1
No       Manual    256  ::/0                       10  fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a
No       Manual    256  ::1/128                     1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  2001:470:7b:1e6::/64       25  IP6Tunnel
No       Manual    256  2001:470:7b:1e6::/64       10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  2001:470:7b:1e6::2/128     25  IP6Tunnel
No       Manual    256  2001:470:7b:1e6::3/128     10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    8    2001:470:c377:bad::/64     10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  2001:470:c377:bad:e08a:21b2:9cfc:8de4/128   10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  2001:470:c377:bad:fd01:1c23:2b:31d0/128   10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  fe80::/64                  25  IP6Tunnel
No       Manual    256  fe80::/64                  10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  fe80::/64                  11  Wireless Network Connection 2
No       Manual    256  fe80::5efe:192.168.1.52/128   23  isatap.{2BE7B38B-9ACF-414D-B060-E9CD1C76DF17}
No       Manual    256  fe80::699a:7ad9:b412:8730/128   25  IP6Tunnel
No       Manual    256  fe80::e850:e64e:9436:27d/128   11  Wireless Network Connection 2
No       Manual    256  fe80::fd01:1c23:2b:31d0/128   10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  ff00::/8                    1  Loopback Pseudo-Interface 1
No       Manual    256  ff00::/8                   25  IP6Tunnel
No       Manual    256  ff00::/8                   10  Local Area Connection
No       Manual    256  ff00::/8                   11  Wireless Network Connection 2


Current status:

I get 0/10 from test-ipv6.com.  Common-sense debugging says my router and ISP can pass “protocol 41” because I had it working.
Bizzarely, since the ping to google shows the IPv6 address, then IPv6 DNS must be working.

If I had to make an extremely un-educated guess, I’d say that my attempts at IPv6 communications are trying to go through the regular LAN adapter, and don’t know to try the tunnel for some reason.  (Can you tell that I’m seriously out of my depth here?)
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cholzhauer

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2013, 05:47:04 AM »

Quote
Then, the putative gateway address looked not as good: (How can it say “destination host unreachable”, and then give you ping results from that host)

C:\Windows\system32>ping -6 2001:470:7b:1e6::1

Pinging 2001:470:7b:1e6::1 with 32 bytes of data:
Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::1: time=48ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::1: time=76ms
Reply from 2001:470:7b:1e6::1: time=95ms

Ping statistics for 2001:470:7b:1e6::1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 3, Lost = 1 (25% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 48ms, Maximum = 95ms, Average = 73ms


This is 'normal' behavior.

Since you're behind a NAT, you had to use the NAT address in your commands that you used to create the tunnel.  I get the impression you did that the first time when you had the tunnel working, but did you do that the second time you tried to create the tunnel?  I know you said you copied and pasted the commands, but did you change the IP address to reflect the different IP address of your computer?  Which device is handing out IP addresses?  Is your router doing that at all or are you doing everything manually?
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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2013, 07:59:30 AM »

Thank you for the speedy reply, cholzhauer.

Alas, no.  I do see (now) that this is, far and away, the most common error here.  But I was lucky enough to have read the note on my first time out of the gate.  I definitely used Machine "B"'s local (192.168.*) address in the “add v6v4tunnel”. On both attempts.

So, are you saying that the "ping" behavior is typical of getting the LAN address wrong?  Is there a command I can do to verify what it is?  What else could cause the same result?

Is there a troubleshooting guide anywhere here that I missed?  I mean, I'm jumping right to the final test.  There ought to be a way to go step-by-step, verifying each step independently of all of the others so you could say "you failed step 17: your PC's firewall is stopping you", or "you failed step 32: your ISP isn't passing protocol 41".
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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2013, 08:36:33 AM »

Hey!  The "monkey at the typewriter" method pays off:

[/tt]
C:\Windows\system32>netsh interface ipv6 show interface IP6Tunnel

Interface IP6Tunnel Parameters
----------------------------------------------
IfLuid                             : tunnel_4
IfIndex                            : 25
State                              : connected
Metric                             : 25
Link MTU                           : 1280 bytes
Reachable Time                     : 36000 ms
Base Reachable Time                : 30000 ms
Retransmission Interval            : 1000 ms
DAD Transmits                      : 1
Site Prefix Length                 : 64
Site Id                            : 1
Forwarding                         : disabled
Advertising                        : disabled
Neighbor Discovery                 : disabled
Neighbor Unreachability Detection  : disabled
Router Discovery                   : disabled
Managed Address Configuration      : disabled
Other Stateful Configuration       : disabled
Weak Host Sends                    : disabled
Weak Host Receives                 : disabled
Use Automatic Metric               : enabled
Ignore Default Routes              : disabled
Advertised Router Lifetime         : 1800 seconds
Advertise Default Route            : disabled
Current Hop Limit                  : 0
Force ARPND Wake up patterns       : disabled
Directed MAC Wake up patterns      : disabled
Link-Layer Address                 : 192.168.1.52
Remote Link-Layer Address          : 216.66.77.230
[/tt]

This command at least verifies (I think) that I used the local LAN address and that I didn't miss-type the HE IPv4 address.

This doesn't bring me any closer to why I don't work, though...
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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2013, 07:57:56 PM »

O.K., is this maybe it?  Looking at other people's "netsh interface ipv6 show route" commands, I noticed that they had three "Default Gateway"s on their Local Area Connections.  1) an IPv4 address, probably of their router; 2) A non-routable IPv6 (fe80::etc) which I think is used for talking to other machines on the same LAN; and 3) The "Server IPv6 Address" from HE.

I went to machine "A" that used to have a working tunnel, and it had these three addresses.

Look at my first post, and you'll see that my machine "B" only has 1 and 2, like everyone else, but the third is the IPv6 DHCP-assigned  address from my router.  I turned off the IPv6 DHCP, and now it only has two addresses!  This is it! It has to be!  I have no idea what I'm doing, but this just smells like a fly in the ointment.

Now my problem is: How do I fix that?  What's the command?

Less importantly: why did it happen?  Same commands, same operating systems.  Different results.
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cholzhauer

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2013, 05:19:26 AM »

Alright, hang on.

In my first post I asked you where you were doing DHCPv6 because I had a hunch it was from your router.  That's all fine and dandy, but make sure it's DHCPv6, not SLAAC.

You should have one, maybe two gateway addresses (one private, one public)

Is your tunnel working? 
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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2013, 09:50:55 AM »

Quote
In my first post I asked you where you were doing DHCPv6 because I had a hunch it was from your router.

All due respect cholzhauer, but you might be confusing me for a different clueless, lost user.  You asked me (quite sensibly) if maybe I had used my WAN address the second time.  I knew I hadn't, but a typo was not out of the realm of possibility.  It took a while, but I finally figured out how to do a "netsh interface ipv6 show interface IP6Tunnel" and verify that at least that much was O.K..

Quote
That's all fine and dandy, but make sure it's DHCPv6, not SLAAC.

Anyway, yes, the CISCO RVS4000 is doing the DHCP.  I'm going to go look SLAAC up now...  O.K., I did.  I don't understand it.  Well, what I can say is that the routers configuration screen says it's DHCpv6.  Right now, I've put the "Routed /64" in the DHCP6 address range start and end.  2001:470:7c:1e6::1 and 2001:470:7c:1e6::ff in this case.

The important part is when I do the "ipconfig", the Local Area Connection is picking up an an address in that range.

Quote
You should have one, maybe two gateway addresses (one private, one public)

If by "two", you mean two IPv6, then no.  See my last post.  It looks like I'm supposed to have 1) the IPv4 of the router; 2) An fe8/9; and 3) the "Server IPv6 Address" from HE.  I don't have #3. 

I had since managed to shoe-horn it in with Windows' Control Panel, but it didn't help. It made things worse, so I took it back out.

Quote
Is your tunnel working?

So, here's the latest analysis:

1) test-ipv6.com gives me 0/10.  Fail.
2) "ping -6 {Client IPv6 Address}" comes right back. Pass.
3) "ping -6 {Server IPv6 Address}" times out.  Fail.  (This has changed since my original post.)
4) "ping -4 {Server IPv4 Address}" in 45ms. Pass.
5) "netsh interface ipv6 show route" says there's a route for ::/0 to {Server IPv6 Address}, but it's metric is 256. Fail?
6) "netsh interface ipv6 show interface IP6Tunnel" says both IPv4 addresses are right ({Server IPv4 Address} and 192.168..) Pass.
7) "ipconfig" says, well, a lot of stuff...
Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection 2:
   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6::beef:3
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:fd01:1c23:2b:31d0
   Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:5185:288f:e022:5590
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::fd01:1c23:2b:31d0%10
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.52
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%10
                                       192.168.1.16
Tunnel adapter IP6Tunnel:
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::2
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::699a:7ad9:b412:8730%25
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::1
Tunnel adapter isatap.{2BE7B38B-9ACF-414D-B060-E9CD1C76DF17}:
   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
Tunnel adapter isatap.{02E27394-63FF-47BE-B1F9-E2923DA474C5}:
   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

7a)  The first IPv6 address is the one assigned by the router's DHCP.
7b)  The second one is in the same /64 as the router's address, but I don't know where he's getting the specific address.
7c)  Same for whatever the "Temporary IPv6 Address" is.  Same subnet. Seemingly random address.
7d)  Ordinary looking non-routable address.
7e)  The IPv4 address and IPv4 gateway address are both correct.
7f)  But there's only one IPv6 address in the default gateway, and it's an fe8/9 guy. Fail?
7g)  The IP6Tunnel adapter is there, and his addresses look right.

I'm stumped.  Not hard when it comes to me and networks, admittedly.  But now I'm even stumped for a WAG.

Anyone think there's any value in going into Window's Control Panel and Uninstalling/Installing "Internet Protocol Version 6(TCP/IPv6)" and then entering the HE Example Configuration again?  <out loud to machine B> "I will start with an FDISK if I have to..." >:(
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cholzhauer

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2013, 04:11:27 PM »

I'm on my phone, so it's hard to scroll up and down to look at your post, so I'll just jot a few notes for now.

You shouldn't see the he address as a default gateway on your lan connection because it's not taking to he..you ip6tunnel adapter is.  In your routing table, your default route should point to the ::1 address on the he end of the tunnel.  That address is accessible via your ip6tunnel adapter.  Until you can ping the ::1 on the he side, your tunnel isn't working.

I know that's pretty generic, I'll try and help more when I get to a real keyboard
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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2013, 07:42:06 PM »

No, no. I'll take "generic" gratefully.  As I've said, I'm totally in the dark here.  So I'd be ecstatic if we could run a balloon on a cat: at least I'd see a spark.

I tried to back to square one, and deleted every address, route and interface that had "IP6Tunnel" on it, rebooted,   then I reentered the HE commands again. 

The good news is, I can ping my ::1.  The bad news is, I still can't bring up "IPv6.google.com" and I still get 0/10 on "test-ipv6.com".

Here's a screen capture (fwiw):
http://www.badgers.org/eBay/screencap.jpg
Hope it helps.
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cholzhauer

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2013, 06:30:17 PM »

I can ping 2001:470:7b:1e6::1, but not 2001:470:7b:1e6::2, which means your computer is offline or it didn't work in the first place.

You're saying you can ping 2001:470:7b:1e6::1 ?

Which device on your network is doing RA?  The gateway on your LAN adapter isn't correct...what address does fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%10 point to?

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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2013, 10:17:27 PM »

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I can ping 2001:470:7b:1e6::1, but not 2001:470:7b:1e6::2, which means your computer is offline or it didn't work in the first place.

But wouldn't my router stop your incoming ping?  Or the workstation's firewall?  Anyway, at the time of your message (oh-dark-thirty we called it, NOT zero-dark-thirty) my IPv6 guinea pig would have been sound asleep, like it's operator. 

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You're saying you can ping 2001:470:7b:1e6::1 ?

Yes!  That much is working at the moment. 

Now, here's where my lack of network understanding is really going to shine...

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Which device on your network is doing RA?

What's an "RA".  Other than the guy that died in the first Stargate movie, I mean.  I googled it and all I could find was a sushi bar.

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The gateway on your LAN adapter isn't correct...what address does fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%10 point to?

How do I tell what it's pointing to?   As I understand it, an fe80 address is like the IPv4's 192.168.. 
I guessed that the R in RA might mean route, so I did a show route and no hits on that specific address.  (The results are also in my first post in this thread.)

I can ping fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a, though.  I unplugged machine "A" (the workstation that used to host the IPv6, and worked) and I could still ping it.  I unplugged the switch from the router (machine "B", the current problem connects to the switch) and then got "Request timed out". 

So it looks like fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a is probably the router.  That's not the address I gave him.  I told him he was 2001:470:7c:1e6::feed:face and that he could V6DHCP addresses 2001:470:7c:1e6::beef:1 through 2001:470:7c:1e6::beef:9a.  I chose those numbers because they would be eminently recognizable, even in a page full of addresses. 

So maybe the fe80... is a link-local address the router made up for himself?  And he really is an IPv6 gateway for any other IPv6 devices on the same physical LAN.  I'm not saying that it's not what's goofing up my tunnel, but it might actually be normal.  ...  I just checked, and machine "C" can ping -6 the link-local IPv6 of machines "A" and "B", so the router must be capable of passing the IPv6 around.  AND everyone is picking up their "beef" from it's DHCP.

So, I'm back to clueless.  I'm going to go do something less frustrating now.  Like teach a pig to sing. 

P.S.  It doesn't look like I said earlier, but the router is a CISCO RVS4000 and the switches are CISCO SG 100D-08 and SD2005 and a Linksys model that's not in the path anywhere.
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cholzhauer

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2013, 05:08:27 AM »

RA=  Router Advertisements. Think of DHCP, but without the ability to reserve addresses and assign certain addresses.  RA is used in combo with DHCP...DHCP gives you address flexibility and other 'options' while RA provides the gateway address.

I think your gateway address is wrong because it points to your router, which isn't hosting the tunnel (your computer is)
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pastorbadger

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Re: moving the tunnel to a new computer on the LAN...unsuccessfully
« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2013, 08:03:29 AM »

RA=  Router Advertisements.

Ah.  That makes sense.  That is a settable attribute on the router, and it is enabled.

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I think your gateway address is wrong because it points to your router, which isn't hosting the tunnel (your computer is)

But my Gateway Address on the Tunnel Adapter is HE's Server {IPv6 Address}::1 address. 

The two addresses on LAN adapter (one v4 and one v6) are both pointing at the router.  Isn't that correct?  I mean, that is the route to all of the other devices on the local LAN, right.  And machine "B" can ping the other local devices' address.  So the router is dong what it's supposed to do, right?

I'm more curious why each machine's LAN adapter seems to have five addresses for itself, including machine "A" (the one that used to host the tunnel).  They both have this:

1)  The DHCP-assigned Ipv4
2)  The DHCP-assigned Ipv6
3)  A link-local fe8...
(I would expect the list to stop here)
4)  A second, random v6 in the same subnet as the router
5)  A "Temporary" v6, again, in the same subnet.

Is this normal?

Machine "A":
C:\Users\Bucky Butler>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 3:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6::beef:1d
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:7986:980b:761f:6a98
   Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:897:3026:58e0:f34a
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::7986:980b:761f:6a98%9
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.12

   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:1f10:259::1
                                       fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%9
                                       192.168.1.16

Tunnel adapter isatap.{48144735-7E40-43AD-B676-682D091E45CD}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter isatap.{97C320AE-4866-4873-BE2F-E5DE9E7F06FC}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :



Machine "B":
C:\Windows\system32>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6::beef:6
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:d8e0:5fd9:95ef:9161
   Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:6471:9357:dd6c:ec77
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::d8e0:5fd9:95ef:9161%11
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.52

   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%11
                                       192.168.1.16

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6::beef:1e
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:4919:b5a:e9ea:e5e1
   Temporary IPv6 Address. . . . . . : 2001:470:7c:1e6:79b5:ac62:4026:5e9
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::4919:b5a:e9ea:e5e1%10
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.67
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : fe80::d2d0:fdff:fe66:a34a%10
                                       192.168.1.16

Tunnel adapter isatap.{A00BFA01-91F1-45B4-98B4-E8FE99615014}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 9:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:5ef5:79fb:28d0:14d1:3f57:fecb
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::28d0:14d1:3f57:fecb%13
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

Tunnel adapter isatap.{A7B2F4D1-AE01-448C-A68B-70BD264AB1AB}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter IP6Tunnel:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::2
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::15dc:9e2:a02b:cef6%15
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2001:470:7b:1e6::1

C:\Windows\system32>
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