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Author Topic: Cannot enter 'Guru Level' because registrar has no IPv6 accessible DNS servers  (Read 4780 times)

stemos

  • Newbie
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  • Posts: 2

Hi,

Iīm not able to enter 'Guru Level' because my registrar, which is amongst Top 3 in Germany according to the numbers of registrations in ".de", has no IPv6 accessible DNS servers (or in other words, there are no IPv6 glue records for domains that I buy from him. When I buy a domain from him, the domain is tied up to his DNS servers which are IPv4 only). He is able to insert AAAA records for hosts within these domains, at least, so I was able to pass the tests up to 'Professionel Level'.

So, my question is:
- Does the 'Guru Test' really make sense in its current characteristics if even a German Top 3 registrar makes the test to fail and does not let me any chance to pass it? In my opinion, the test does not reflect 'real life' where registrars are not willing to support customers that themselfes ARE willing to deal with IPv6. And I'm afraid that the majority of todays registrars does not support IPv6.
- Is it possible to 'circumvent' this problem and enter the next level (which I will pass because all prereqisites are fulfilled)? Of course, I could delegate a subdomain to my own DNS servers which are accessible via IPv6 and repeat the certification tests, but it should work with 'mydomain.de' directly.

stemos
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chiel

  • Guest

You are right, but I think that is a good thing.
Now you go to your registar and ask them when they are planning for IPv6 adoption. That way they will get demand from there customers to start deploying IPv6. That YOU now have IPv6 experience is clear, but raising awareness to other companies is the next step.

You can also go to a other registar and tell them your reason to switch, then they will know that supporting IPv6 was a good decision.

When I buy a domain from him, the domain is tied up to his DNS servers which are IPv4 only).

You can also set up your own authoritative DNS servers, I think every registar will support that.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 04:58:06 PM by chiel »
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stemos

  • Newbie
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  • Posts: 2

Hi chiel,

thanks for answering my post! I have thought about your indications, see comments below.

>> Now you go to your registar and ask them when they are planning for IPv6 adoption
I have asked them, and they have no concrete plans (remember: amongst TOP 3 in Germany...), because: From their point of view, they have done everything that is needed right now: Every customer can get an AAAA record for ressources in the domains that they register and operate for him, the DNS transport protocol (be it IPv4 or IPv6) is unimportant.

>> raising awareness to other companies is the next step
Thatīs right, but is this really in the sense of the certification program? Wouldnīt it mean that one can go on with the certification only after he had 'converted legacy IPv4 world by missionary work'? That may last several years :-)

>>You can also go to a other registar and tell them your reason to switch, then they will know that supporting IPv6 was a good decision.
>>You can also set up your own authoritative DNS servers, I think every registar will support that.
Thatīs right, but it does not reflect current production environments that large companies often use (DNS registration and operating are outsourced to a well-known service provider). The certification program should take into account that - not comparable to a private citizen who can change his providers almost arbitrarily - a company has little influence to service providers of a certain magnitude.

In my opinion, a continous IPv6 DNS delegation path is not necessary to prove a companies IPv6 engagement, and it should be removed from the certification test.

stemos
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broquea

  • Sr. Network Engineer, HE.NET AS6939
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  • Posts: 1731

And it won't be removed.

Having your NS reachable over IPv6 is important, especially for IPv6 only networks to have the ability to query for your domain if they ever choose to send packets your way. And yes they exist, in lab & in production, and pretty soon (2-3yrs) mostly in production in regions that can not longer get IPv4 resources. Also the test is more about testing if you (meaning all of you taking the test) figured out how to run DNS software and make it reachable over IPv6 & serve IPv6 records. Not so much the relying on someone else to think for you. These are technical tests aimed at people that want to learn and test what they've learned. Large companies in fact DO operate their own nameservers, please WHOIS entities like Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, GE, etc. (hey, you said large companies).

Fact of the matter is even if you skipped Guru, with your current "in the top 3" registrar you wouldn't pass Sage if they won't create AAAA records for their NS and push them into the TLD servers as glue. If companies & individuals aren't pressing for IPv6 support with their registrars, then of course they won't see a reason to provide for it. Don't be defeatist! Tell them you want the support, if you have friends/partner companies using them and interested in IPv6, make them tell them! Vote with your money, regardless of that registrar's status, anyone can sell you domain registration. Also I cannot think of a single registrar that doesn't let you run your own name servers and forces you to use theirs. If you run your own name servers, and they even let you create host records in your domain for them, AND even let you enter an IPv6 address for that host record, then they should be capable of sending it up to the TLD servers and providing glue.

You are also always welcome to reset certification and use a different domain that will have full IPv6 support all the way to the TLD servers. Simply email ipv6@he.net regarding this and we'll process the request.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2010, 11:20:07 AM by broquea »
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