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Author Topic: Simple Question  (Read 5032 times)

zyndro

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Simple Question
« on: April 05, 2010, 09:16:10 AM »

Hello there!


I'm new here and i have some questions.. maybe you guys can help me out!

I've been reading about all of this of ipv4 and ipv6 and I'm really confused, but what i want to know is..

Let's say i have my own ipv4 website and domain, it's been working without problems for years, will be necessary to register the same domain in ipv6 format?

Let's put it in this way.. if i have in ipv4 the website www.abc.com and i want it in ipv6 format, should i register that ipv6 address to my name aswell or is not necessary?  would be possible that someone else register the www.abc.com in ipv6 format?

another way to explain..

I want to make sure that when you type www.abc.com in ipv4 and ipv6 goes to the same site, i don't want that someone else register the www.abc.com to his name in ipv6.

i don't know if i explained well, sorry for my English!


thanks so much!


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cholzhauer

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2010, 09:46:44 AM »

Quote
Let's say i have my own ipv4 website and domain, it's been working without problems for years, will be necessary to register the same domain in ipv6 format?

Eventually.  Right now, the vast majority of people do not have IPv6 access at their house or place of employment.  When the IPv6 "rollout" is finished, you will need to do so. 

Quote
Let's put it in this way.. if i have in ipv4 the website www.abc.com and i want it in ipv6 format, should i register that ipv6 address to my name aswell or is not necessary? 

If your domain is reachable over IPv6, I don't see why you wouldn't want people to access it via IPv6.  Eventually, when everyone has IPv6 access, you would need a DNS entry for that domain/site.

Quote
would be possible that someone else register the www.abc.com in ipv6 format?

I suppose you could do this in theory, just as you could with IPv4. You own the domain abc.com; you control where that domain is hosted and what IP address it re-directs to.
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zyndro

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2010, 11:42:32 AM »

Thanks for the info!


Ok and what should i do or need to register my domain in ipv6?

Can i just register the domain to my name even if I'm not thinking use it at the moment?


Thanks again, i really appreciate the support!
-Brian.
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cholzhauer

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2010, 11:49:07 AM »

Quote
Ok and what should i do or need to register my domain in ipv6?

Where are you hosting your site?  If the person/place hosting your site isn't IPv6 enabled, this is all a mute point.  If whomever is doing your DNS isn't IPv6 enabled, this won't work either.

Assuming you do have IPv6 access and your site will work over IPv6, you will need to create an AAAA record for your site with whomever is hosting your DNS.  You should also create the reverse lookup too.

Quote
Can i just register the domain to my name even if I'm not thinking use it at the moment?

The domain itself?  Sure, there's nothing saying you have to actually use your domain for anything after you buy it; I'm sure the registrars would love it if you would pay for a domain and not use it.
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zyndro

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2010, 12:34:47 PM »


Where are you hosting your site?  If the person/place hosting your site isn't IPv6 enabled, this is all a mute point.  If whomever is doing your DNS isn't IPv6 enabled, this won't work either.


I have my site in goddady.com, however I'm not planning use the ipv6 format yet, i guess someday all the ipv4 sites will have to migrate to ipv6, by then I'll do the process, but it's not something that i want to get into at the moment, just by having my domain in ipv6 secure it's enough for me.
=D


Thank you for your help cholzhauer!
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cholzhauer

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2010, 12:36:57 PM »

I'm using godaddy too.  They aren't actually hosting my sites, but they're doing all of my external DNS.  It seriously took me 2 minutes between the time I logged in and the time I had functioning AAAA records.
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zyndro

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2010, 12:52:16 PM »

omg!


There's some kind of guide for dummies or so?

I have no idea how to do that, not even know what i need to do!!  =(

By the way.. i was trying to register my domain in ipv6 at godaddy, but i think they don't provide this service right?

Where can i register my domain in ipv6?

I was checking this site:  http://domainregistry.my/manual.php  but it says i must have a company in Malasya.. omg!!
 
I'm from Costa Rica..


Best Regards,
-Brian.
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cholzhauer

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2010, 01:27:16 PM »

http://www.tunnelbroker.net/forums/index.php?topic=157.0

Look at reply #10

It's for Ipv6 glue, but it'll give you an idea of what's going on.

For the lookups, it's the same as doing an A record...you just choose AAAA instead.
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jimb

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Re: Simple Question
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2010, 05:18:58 PM »

Simple answer to a simple question:  There is no separate registration for IPv6 vs. IPv4 addresses with regard to DNS domains.

You own your DNS domain.  There is no separate DNS name space for IPv4 and IPv6 domains.  That is, a DNS domain is a DNS domain, and whether is points to an IPv4 or IPv6 web site is dictated by what you put in the domain.  No one can register an "IPv6 version" of your domain, because that doesn't exist.  DNS domains and the IP version your web site runs are independent of each other.

If you want to add IPv6 to your web site, you simple configure IPv6 on your network and web site.  At that point your web server will accept requests over IPv6.  Now you can simply add an IPv6 AAAA record to your domain name entry, and your web site will have an IPv6 address in the DNS.

For example, if www.abc.com had an IPv4 address of 192.0.2.10, it would have an A record looking like this:
www.abc.com IN A 192.0.2.10

Now, if you set up IPv6 on your server and network, and added the IPv6 address "2001:db8:1234:10" to the web server, and wanted the site to also be accessible via IPv6 in addition to IPv4, you'd add an AAAA record:
www.abc.com IN AAAA 2001:db8:1234:10

That's it.  Now your web site has both IPv4 and IPv6 access.

Some people prefer to keep the IPv4 and IPv6 domain names for their servers separate for various reasons.  Typicaly, this is done with a subdomain.  So for instance, you could create a subdomain called "ipv6.abc.com" and put all your web sites in that (for instance www.ipv6.abc.com), and keep all the IPv6 AAAA records in that subdomain.  No one can steal that subdomain from you either, since it's part of the parent domain you own of course.

Additionally, DNS doesn't care whether it's running under IPv4 or IPv6 to return IPv6 resource records.  In other words, a DNS server which is using only an IPv4 address can serve up IPv6 AAAA records and the ip6.arpa reverse domain just fine.  Likewise a DNS server which has only an IPv6 address has no problem serving up any type of resource records including IPv4 A records.  Right now it's best to run both an IPv4 and IPv6 on ones DNS server to provide universal access.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2010, 05:23:09 PM by jimb »
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