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Author Topic: Testing protocol 41  (Read 839 times)

leifnel

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Testing protocol 41
« on: February 22, 2017, 08:29:11 AM »

Does there exist any linux tools which can test if protocol 41 gets through the network (4G) and my router?

I have access to linux boxes outside my network which can be used as endpoints.
But as my home network has no public IP; it is on Carrier grade Nat, the connections have to be initiated from my network to my external hosts.

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tjeske

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Re: Testing protocol 41
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2017, 09:35:31 AM »

I don't think proto 41 works like that. It's not like you open a connection, and this connection stays open and all data flows through it and the switches at your end will know where to send the data. No. Proto 41 needs end-to-end connectivity. How should the gateway know it is you that wants this package? You can monitor your interface with Wireshark to check for incoming proto 41 packages, but I think most 4G gateways will only work for TCP and - if you're lucky - UDP and ICMP.
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cholzhauer

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Re: Testing protocol 41
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2017, 12:04:17 PM »

You would use something like wire shark to look at incoming packets, but as was mentioned, it won't normally work with CGN
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divad27182

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Re: Testing protocol 41
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2017, 04:34:09 AM »

Does there exist any linux tools which can test if protocol 41 gets through the network (4G) and my router?

I have access to linux boxes outside my network which can be used as endpoints.
But as my home network has no public IP; it is on Carrier grade Nat, the connections have to be initiated from my network to my external hosts.

nmap can do it, to some extent. 

You can try something like:
Code: [Select]
nmap -sO -p 1,6,17,41 hostname
The downside is that it can't always distinguish open from filtered.

--David
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